Intel

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#41
i watched the movie LOGAN over the weekend. Didn't really have a good impression with the self driving trucks inside the movie Smile I am fine with driving as an activity, but i hate the jams but i reckon self driving cars aint going to resolve the jam issue (yet)?

There is too much cheap money looking for higher returns. The sharing economy has just started and it will take some time before the winners/survivors become evident. In the meanwhile, i guess startups like Mobike can continue to raise half a billion dollars every now and then. People are scared of missed opportunities than losing money. In anyways, VCs have always bet on multiple ideas but reap the gain off the homerun idea.

Grab ans Uber are trying to kill each other off. in a "network effect" business, u r either first or risk getting killed off. For commodities like taxis, i am not sure if there can be branding or niche areas to build the competitive moat. But 1 thing is for sure - The end loser will be traditional cab companies - they will survive for sure, but the moat will be destroyed together with its margins.

I will also bet that the taxi drivers in their 30s, will nt get to have their job displaced during their career (p.s. most probably take my opinion frivilously because i dont have any skin in the game yet)
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#41
i watched the movie LOGAN over the weekend. Didn't really have a good impression with the self driving trucks inside the movie Smile I am fine with driving as an activity, but i hate the jams but i reckon self driving cars aint going to resolve the jam issue (yet)?

There is too much cheap money looking for higher returns. The sharing economy has just started and it will take some time before the winners/survivors become evident. In the meanwhile, i guess startups like Mobike can continue to raise half a billion dollars every now and then. People are scared of missed opportunities than losing money. In anyways, VCs have always bet on multiple ideas but reap the gain off the homerun idea.

Grab ans Uber are trying to kill each other off. in a "network effect" business, u r either first or risk getting killed off. For commodities like taxis, i am not sure if there can be branding or niche areas to build the competitive moat. But 1 thing is for sure - The end loser will be traditional cab companies - they will survive for sure, but the moat will be destroyed together with its margins.

I will also bet that the taxi drivers in their 30s, will nt get to have their job displaced during their career (p.s. most probably take my opinion frivilously because i dont have any skin in the game yet)
Reply
#42
Intel's CEO reportedly sold shares after the company already knew about massive security flaws

Saheli Roy Choudhury
Published January 4, 2018

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich sold off a large chunk of his stake in the company last year — after the chipmaker was already aware of serious security flaws in its computer processors, according to multiple reports.

The chipmaker did not immediately respond to CNBC's emailed request for comments sent outside U.S. office hours.

Other outlets have reported an Intel spokeswoman said Krzanich's decision to sell the shares was unrelated to the security vulnerability disclosed this week.

According to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing in late November, Krzanich acquired and sold 644,135 shares at a weighted average price of $44.05 by exercising his options. Those options let him purchase the shares at prices between $12.985 and $26.795, significantly lower than where Intel was trading at the time.

More details in https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/04/intel-ce...flaws.html
Specuvestor: Asset - Business - Structure.
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#42
Intel's CEO reportedly sold shares after the company already knew about massive security flaws

Saheli Roy Choudhury
Published January 4, 2018

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich sold off a large chunk of his stake in the company last year — after the chipmaker was already aware of serious security flaws in its computer processors, according to multiple reports.

The chipmaker did not immediately respond to CNBC's emailed request for comments sent outside U.S. office hours.

Other outlets have reported an Intel spokeswoman said Krzanich's decision to sell the shares was unrelated to the security vulnerability disclosed this week.

According to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing in late November, Krzanich acquired and sold 644,135 shares at a weighted average price of $44.05 by exercising his options. Those options let him purchase the shares at prices between $12.985 and $26.795, significantly lower than where Intel was trading at the time.

More details in https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/04/intel-ce...flaws.html
Specuvestor: Asset - Business - Structure.
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#43
Intel unveils first artificial intelligence chip Springhill

Reporting by Steven Scheer; Editing by Tova Cohen
AUGUST 20, 2019 / 10:04 PM

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Intel Corp on Tuesday unveiled its latest processor that will be its first using artificial intelligence (AI) and is designed for large computing centers.

The chip, developed at its development facility in Haifa, Israel, is known as Nervana NNP-I or Springhill and is based on a 10 nanometer Ice Lake processor that will allow it to cope with high workloads using minimal amounts of energy, Intel said.

Facebook, it said, already has started using the product.

Intel said its first AI product comes after it had invested in Israeli AI startups, including Habana Labs and NeuroBlade.

More details in https://www.reuters.com/article/us-tech-...SKCN1VA1LS
Specuvestor: Asset - Business - Structure.
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#43
Intel unveils first artificial intelligence chip Springhill

Reporting by Steven Scheer; Editing by Tova Cohen
AUGUST 20, 2019 / 10:04 PM

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Intel Corp on Tuesday unveiled its latest processor that will be its first using artificial intelligence (AI) and is designed for large computing centers.

The chip, developed at its development facility in Haifa, Israel, is known as Nervana NNP-I or Springhill and is based on a 10 nanometer Ice Lake processor that will allow it to cope with high workloads using minimal amounts of energy, Intel said.

Facebook, it said, already has started using the product.

Intel said its first AI product comes after it had invested in Israeli AI startups, including Habana Labs and NeuroBlade.

More details in https://www.reuters.com/article/us-tech-...SKCN1VA1LS
Specuvestor: Asset - Business - Structure.
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#44
In an alternate history, Otellini might have been right.

Intel’s Disruption is Now Complete

Here’s what Otellini decided to do, when presented with the option to power the iPhone:

"We ended up not winning it or passing on it, depending on how you want to view it. And the world would have been a lot different if we'd done it," Otellini told me in a two-hour conversation during his last month at Intel. "The thing you have to remember is that this was before the iPhone was introduced and no one knew what the iPhone would do... At the end of the day, there was a chip that they were interested in that they wanted to pay a certain price for and not a nickel more and that price was below our forecasted cost. I couldn't see it. It wasn't one of these things you can make up on volume. And in hindsight, the forecasted cost was wrong and the volume was 100x what anyone thought.”

https://jamesallworth.medium.com/intels-...fa771f0f2c
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#44
In an alternate history, Otellini might have been right.

Intel’s Disruption is Now Complete

Here’s what Otellini decided to do, when presented with the option to power the iPhone:

"We ended up not winning it or passing on it, depending on how you want to view it. And the world would have been a lot different if we'd done it," Otellini told me in a two-hour conversation during his last month at Intel. "The thing you have to remember is that this was before the iPhone was introduced and no one knew what the iPhone would do... At the end of the day, there was a chip that they were interested in that they wanted to pay a certain price for and not a nickel more and that price was below our forecasted cost. I couldn't see it. It wasn't one of these things you can make up on volume. And in hindsight, the forecasted cost was wrong and the volume was 100x what anyone thought.”

https://jamesallworth.medium.com/intels-...fa771f0f2c
Reply
#45
To fend off Motorola chip that powered Apple, IBM RISC processors, newcomer Cyrix and perennial enemy AMD, Intel relied heavily on Moore’s law ie brawns rather than efficiency. But as the node size approached the size of an atom it is becoming more more difficult and moving towards material science, which TSMC seems to be doing better. Single core performance improvement has actually slowed significantly while multi-core (again adding more transistors) and threading has taken over.

The flip side to focusing brawns vs efficiency is that energy consumption takes a hit. So intel chips was not suited for mobile which is why laptops have power saving functions to step down the chip. And totally unsuitable for phones, which was what they were trying to do with Atom chip. Xscale was promising but they decided not to disrupt themselves just as the major car makers are initially resistant to EV. But progress of cars is pedestrian vs semiconductors which gave major car makers time to adjust; but not so for semicons

I’m not sure if intel culture can change easily looking at their progress on SoC vs say the M1 chip
Before you speak, listen. Before you write, think. Before you spend, earn. Before you invest, investigate. Before you criticize, wait. Before you pray, forgive. Before you quit, try. Before you retire, save. Before you die, give. –William A. Ward

Think Asset-Business-Structure (ABS)
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#45
To fend off Motorola chip that powered Apple, IBM RISC processors, newcomer Cyrix and perennial enemy AMD, Intel relied heavily on Moore’s law ie brawns rather than efficiency. But as the node size approached the size of an atom it is becoming more more difficult and moving towards material science, which TSMC seems to be doing better. Single core performance improvement has actually slowed significantly while multi-core (again adding more transistors) and threading has taken over.

The flip side to focusing brawns vs efficiency is that energy consumption takes a hit. So intel chips was not suited for mobile which is why laptops have power saving functions to step down the chip. And totally unsuitable for phones, which was what they were trying to do with Atom chip. Xscale was promising but they decided not to disrupt themselves just as the major car makers are initially resistant to EV. But progress of cars is pedestrian vs semiconductors which gave major car makers time to adjust; but not so for semicons

I’m not sure if intel culture can change easily looking at their progress on SoC vs say the M1 chip
Before you speak, listen. Before you write, think. Before you spend, earn. Before you invest, investigate. Before you criticize, wait. Before you pray, forgive. Before you quit, try. Before you retire, save. Before you die, give. –William A. Ward

Think Asset-Business-Structure (ABS)
Reply


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